Category Archives: editing

A year in review

It’s that time of year, where a frantic scramble to get things done is not only predicted, it’s somewhat expected. In my life, we have not only the holidays, but also both of my children’s birthdays flanking Christmas, and my visions of my own personal deadlines so I can look over my year of work and be pleased with myself.

I frequently make myself sick this time of year.

Three days before Christmas, and I still must venture out for a few small presents for dear friends, but this writing business stops for no one.

The year has been a modest one in terms of word count. I started, and then stopped around 50k, a tightly-wound story about a family in the throes of crisis, having written myself into a corner. I hope to go back and figure out how to unravel this, because I think, at the heart of it, the story is a sound one, and interesting. With Laila Blake, I completed a collection of short stories centered around our characters from After Life Lessons (you can find it here), as well as the first draft for the second, and final, book featuring those characters and their post-apocalyptic world. I completed the first in a trilogy about a dystopian world with a mysterious narrator, and rewrote 3/4 of a novel I originally completed last December, giving this year a sort of fun, cyclical sort of ending. Several pieces of erotica were also accepted this year, and a few have come out in print already, with more planned in anthologies next year.

This year, on a lot of fronts, was more dedicated to the publishing side of writing, which is a much newer experience for yours truly. Editing is one of my favorite activities, and one of my greater skills, and I found myself doing a lot more of that this year, with several rewrites and edits on After Life Lessons before it went to print in April, as well as several edits on At the Edge of the World, which came out in August. I also have picked over and helped groom Laila’s first two installments of the Lakeside Series, and the last in her Breaking in Waves trilogy.

From there, I am still a little floundering, still learning to swim, in a way. Lilt Literary is slowly gaining steam, and with it, we are working on aspects of publishing that are mostly new and foreign to us. I used to work in marketing, in advertising, but on the production end: I wrote and composed ads, I did not sell them. I am innately shy, a little terrified of talking to just about anyone– I had a friend once comment that I never looked in anyone’s eyes, something I’d never really noticed, but find myself doing kind of constantly unless I know a person well.

Marketing yourself is hard. It is even harder when you, as a person, don’t do well talking yourself up, not to mention live in a society where women are, for the most part, conditioned to shy away from self-congratulation, from believing they’re worth listening to, or caring about. Selling a book is a little like selling yourself– I’m not one to compare a book to a baby, but, certainly, it represents a large amount of time, and effort, and skills, and, so, it’s a product of you, of your abilities. Telling someone how great it is, and that they should care about it, read it, is like telling them why they should be your friend. It’s uncomfortable at best, horrifying at the worst.

Independant and self-publishing means you’re doing a majority of the work of a book on your own. You write it, you proof it, you edit and re-edit, you design and format and convert files, get it to distributors, advertise. At Lilt Literary, we’re lucky to both be trained as editors, and proof-readers, and pride ourselves on tightly-written and edited work. Laila is a wizard with graphic design, and has produced jaw-dropping covers for all of our books.  We’ve become well-versed with computer formatting for different output (both physical and digital), and in many avenues of distribution.

My confidence wavers at advertising. As a small-time publishing house, we are shut out of many traditional channels: obviously we’re not going to be able to put an ad in a widely-read magazine, or get ourselves on a talk show. Our budget is smaller than a traditional publishing house, and so getting our books on the shelves of local and national bookstores isn’t within our ability at this moment.

There is a stigma attached to independent and self-publishing, too, one that is, and isn’t, accurate. With the ease of Amazon uploading, for instance, a person can take a poorly-written fanfic and have it for sale in 5 minutes flat. What is a beautiful invention– the ability to reach masses with a click of a mouse– can be burdened by lack of quality control. While this is a topic for another time (and I do love talking about it), the point is more: it’s hard to get noticed, harder to get people to read, and believe, in your ability when you are not coming out of a big-name publisher.

It’s definitely been a learning process, but one that is slowly becoming easier, clearer, and showing results. Over the last year alone I, and we, have learned so much about getting our books to readers, and making a successful profit, that I’m actually excited about doing more in the new year, where, even a few months ago, I even loathed writing an email to a potential reviewer.

It turns out writing is an ever-evolving practice. Who knew?

Here’s wishing you the happiest of holidays, and bountiful new year.


New Release: By the Light of the Moon (Lakeside #1) + Giveaway

Less than two months ago, we celebrated the release of After Life Lessons on April 8th 2014. It was a coincidence, the desire to hold fast to the traditional book release Tuesday, and a conscious disassociation with April Fools Day a week previous. It was, however, the one-year-anniversary of my very first book release.

AMAZON US | AMAZON UK | AMAZON CA | AMAZON AU | AMAZON DE

On April 8th 2013, Crimson Romance released By the Light of the Moon, and started something really important to me. We have since gone our separate ways, but I will never not be grateful for the opportunity they gave me – in particular the then editor Jennifer Lawler, who believed in me. It was difficult time for me, maybe the lowest of my life yet, and the fact that someone did – someone thought I was good enough to publish meant the world for me and shaped the way I’ve approached writing ever since.

The imprint changed over time, as everything does, and even before I submitted Book 2 in the Lakeside series, I had a feeling my writing didn’t fit in there anymore. In the end, we decided to part ways over creative differences regarding this series – which I wished to take away from a mostly romance trilogy and towards a more general fantasy story with a strong romance side-plot. I decided I was better off doing it myself, but my gratitude remains with Crimson Romance and the wonderful authors I met there.

The Revisions

From the first, even before the original publications, there were things I wanted to change. But the imprint was on a schedule, and I had been stupid enough to start submitting before I was 100% sold on my own manuscript. I was impatient and silly and never would have thought anyone would actually pick it up; I just wanted to be part of the game, you know?

But once it was published, unsurprisingly, it was exactly those issues that kept readers from enjoying the book to the extend they, and I wanted to: the beginning was too complicated, too slow. I’ve spent the last half year, on and off, over and over again, finding ways of unraveling the complications and speeding it up. I created artwork, edited out a host of errors and wrote a few new scenes.
Some of it was painful – like loosing the beautiful lesbian prologue between a Fae and her servant spy. But I think in the end, the book is much better for it.

The Content

By the Light of the Moon is the first book in a romantic paranormal fantasy trilogy, set in alternate history medieval times. It follows the life of a young noblewoman suffering from mental illness and ptsd, her forbidden love story with her shape-shifter guard and the sinister forces around her. It’s a story about magic and love and deception, and I can’t wait to finally promote it the way I always wanted to, to bring the trilogy to it’s conclusion.

Withdrawn and with a reputation for her strange, eccentric ways, young Lady Moira Rochmond is old to be unwed. Rumors say, she has been seen barefoot in the orchard, is awake all night in moon-struck rambles and sleeps all day. Some will even claim her ghostly pallor and aloof manner are signs of illness, of a curse or insanity.

The hopes of the peaceful succession to her father’s fief lie in an advantageous marriage. When a suitor does show interest, her family pushes for a decision.
Almost resigned to the fact that she has no choice but to play the part she has been given in life, Moira is faced with Owain.  A member of the mysterious Blaidyn creatures and a new guard in her father’s castle, he is specifically tasked to keep her safe. He is different from other people she knows and when one night under the full moon, she makes the acquaintance of the wolf who shares Owain’s soul, her life starts to change and to unravel.

AMAZON US | AMAZON UK | AMAZON CA | AMAZON AU | AMAZON DE

Follow Laila’s board Writing: Lakeside on Pinterest.

 

The Giveaway

As always, what fun would it be if I didn’t let you all enter to win something? a Rafflecopter giveaway

 Get your copy today and make a girl really really happy :)

AMAZON US | AMAZON UK | AMAZON CA | AMAZON AU | AMAZON DE

Episode 16: Rewriting

lilt16

in which Laila and Lorrie discuss the difference between editing and rewriting, when the latter is necessary and how to do it.

(If the application doesn’t work for you, please click here for the audio-file!)

What about you? Do you have any good rewriting stories?


Credits:
Our intro music was taken from the Free Music Archive:
GeeNerve - Pink Fish Signs (Take Two).

Filed under: Episodes

Episode 4: Beta-Reading

lilt4

in which Laila and Lorrie discuss beta readers and beta reading – what to expect, how to facilitate the process and how to read the results.
(If the application doesn’t work for you, please click here for the audio-file!)

What about you? Have you had any good experiences beta-reading?
Or would you like to try and don’t quite know how to get involved in it? 
Credits:

Our intro music was taken from the Free Music Archive: 
GeeNerve - Pink Fish Signs (Take Two).

Filed under: Episodes

Episode 3: Working With Editors

lilt3

in which Laila and Lorrie discuss professional editors – what to expect from them, what they are like and how they fit into the puzzle of publishing a beautiful book.?
(If the application doesn’t work for you, please click here for the audio-file!)

What about you? Have you had any experiences with editors worth sharing?
And remember, next week we’ll talk about beta readers, so please comment and ask away about those as well!
Credits:

Our intro music was taken from the Free Music Archive: 
GeeNerve - Pink Fish Signs (Take Two).

Filed under: Episodes

Episode 2: Editing Your Manuscripts

lilt2
in which Laila and Lorrie discuss editing manuscripts from the writer’s side. How much do we do to our writing before we give it into the able hands of other people?
(If the application doesn’t work for you, please click here for the audio-file!)

How do you edit? Do you have writing crutches that you always have to take out?
Or do you have any questions about our two upcoming podcasts about professional editors and about beta readers?
Credits:

Our intro music was taken from the Free Music Archive: 
GeeNerve - Pink Fish Signs (Take Two).

Filed under: Episodes